The Study

  • visuel_cabinet_travail
  • visuel_cabinet_travail
  • visuel_cabinet_travail
  • visuel_cabinet_travail
  • visuel_cabinet_travail

It was in this room that Edouard André and then Nélie Jacquemart organised their daily life and held their business meetings. Interestingly, this room is not laid out in the austere manner of a ministerial office, but has a more intimate décor made up of their favourite objects.

On the walls we find a series of 18th century paintings, including The new model by Fragonard, a masterpiece of licentiousness surrounded by two portraits and two Allegories of the arts by Lagrénée; a composition depicting the Banquet of Don Quixote – Charles-Antoine Coypel’s light-hearted attempt at interpreting the historic genre; another large portrait of a woman attributed to the French school; Fêtes galantes by Pater, the favourite pupil of Watteau; and finally a severe effigy of the engraver Wille which Greuze handles with a brilliance which is as surprising as it is accomplished.

To furnish it, the Andrés brought together some equally prestigious items of furniture: stamped Chevenat chairs covered with tapestries by Aubusson, a Japanese lacquer writing desk decorated in gilt bronze attributed to B.V.R.B., and a Louis XV commode in rosewood with marquetry in violet wood attributed to the cabinetmaker Joseph Baumhauer. At the centre of the room, a Louis XV desk, stamped by Jacques Dubois, the king’s favourite cabinetmaker, has pride of place and bears a small portrait of the lady of the house.

The ceiling is decorated with a transposed fresco, the work of Tiepolo, which came from a Venetian palace and depicts The apotheosis of Hercules.